Thank you cards received

Published: Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012 10:35 a.m. CDT

From Nancy Loudon

Creston

To my great joy, my son brought home a manila envelope full of handwritten, illustrated thank you notes from some of the Creston Elementary fifth-grade students.

I was able to volunteer with "Colonial Days" this past month. Many, many other relatives and friends also participated in this annual event. There were several different stations such as: corn husk dolls, quilting, trapping, games, star lab, making butter, apple cider and cooking.

It was a blustery day, cooking at the open campsite. We chopped carrots, celery, potatoes, garlic, corn and added cubed venison. All of the ingredients, including the firewood to cook "our colonial meal" were generously donated. At the cook station, the children were engaged with Mr. Babbitt's rendition of what a typical Colonial Day consisted of.

This was an all day event with the cooperation of all the fifth-grade teachers, Mr. Driskell, Mr. Baker and staff.

The main point I would like to make about participating with the youth of our area is the fact that they had the heartfelt follow through to express a simple act of saying thank you.

A lost art brought alive by our teachers, I am sure. These notes have educational value. I read somewhere that the words "thank you" is no longer just good manners, they are also beneficial to the self. Being grateful can improve well-being, strengthen social relations, physical health, produce emotional status and help us cope with stress that we may experience in our life.

Parents are the most important teachers a child will have. Lead by example. Let children see you writing thank-you notes and hear or read what you have written. What better way to teach good manners than by modeling the expected behavior. I am grateful my mother taught me this simple act.

Keep up the great work parents, children and educators.

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